Programme


16th December 2010, Thursday

17th December 2010, Friday

Poster presentations


 

Thursday, 16th December 2010

 

9:00 – 9:20 Registration

9:20 – 9:25 Lesley Fitton & David Saunders: Welcome

9:25 – 9:30 Michela Spataro & Alexandra Villing: Introduction

 

Session 1: Technological Choices and Cultural Context

9:30 – 9:50
Ian Whitbread (School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester)
Materials Choices in Utilitarian Pottery: Kitchen Wares in the Berbati Valley, Greece

9:50 – 10:10
Ariane Jacobs (Mediterranean Archaeological Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Brussel) & Virginie Renson (Earth System Science, Geology Department Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
Plain Ware Pottery Production and Consumption at the Late Bronze Age Site of Alassa-Pano Mandilaris: Questions on Ceramic Variability, Technology and Provenance

10:10 – 10:30
Peter Attema & Martijn van Leusen (Groningen Institute of Archaeology)
Late Bronze Age Production and Storage Practices in the Sibaritide (northern Calabria, Italy): The Evidence for “Doli Cordonati” in Rural Contexts

10:30 – 10:50
Peter Day (Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield), Miguel Cau (Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archaeology, Universitat de Barcelona), Catalina Mas (Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archaeology, Universitat de Barcelona) & Noémi Müller (STARC, The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia)
A Contextual Ethnography of Cooking Vessel Production at Portol, Mallorca

10:50 – 11:15 Discussion

 

11:15 – 11:45 Coffee         

 

Session 2:  Specialised Vessels? Organic Residue Analysis and Vessel Function

11:45 – 12:05
Rebecca Stacey (Department of Conservation and Scientific Research, British Museum)
Organic Residue Analysis: An Overview

12:05 – 12:25
Alessandra Pecci  (Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archaeology, Universitat de Barcelona) & Miguel Cau (Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archaeology, Universitat de Barcelona)
Residue Analysis of Late Roman Cooking Pots from the Balearic Islands

12:25 – 12:45
Lucy Cramp (School of Chemistry, University of Bristol), Richard Evershed (School of Chemistry, University of Bristol) & Hella Eckardt (Department of Archaeology, University of Reading)
Direct Evidence for the Mortarium as a Specialised Vessel in Roman Britain via Organic Residue Analysis

12:45 – 13:10 Discussion

 

13:10 – 14: 30 Sandwich lunch

 

Session 3: Specialised Fabrics? Making and Using Ancient Cooking Pottery

14:30 – 14:50
Noémi Müller (Institute of Materials Science, N.C.S.R. “Demokritos”, Athens, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield), Vassilis Kilikoglou (Institute of Materials Science, N.C.S.R. “Demokritos”, Athens)  & Peter Day (Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield)
Home-made Recipes: Tradition and Innovation in Bronze Age Cooking Pots from Akrotiri, Thera

14:50 – 15:10
Walter Gauß (Austrian Archaeological Institute at Athens), Gudrun Klebinder-Gauß (Department of Classical Archaeology, University of Salzburg), Evangelia Kiriatzi, Areti Pentedeka & Mirto Georgakopulou  (Fitch Laboratory, British School at Athens)
Aegina: An Important Centre for the Production of Cooking Ware from Bronze Age to the Classical Period

15:10 – 15:30
Marie-Claude Boileau (University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Philadelphia) & James Whitley (Cardiff School of History and Archaeology, Cardiff University)
True Grit: Production and Exchange of Cooking Wares in the Ninth-Century Aegean

15:30 – 15:55 Discussion

 

15:55 – 16:25 Coffee

 

Session 4: Lifting the Lid on Ancient Cuisine: the  Evidence and its Interpretation

16:25 – 16:45
Ann Steiner (Franklin & Marshall College, Lancaster PA.) 
Etruscan Hellenistic Kitchen Ceramics in Context at the Podere Funghi

16:45 – 17:05
Laura Banducci (Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, University of Michigan)
Cuisine and Food Preparation in Etruria and Latium:  Cooking Stands as Evidence for Change

17:05 – 17:25
Andrew Donnelly (Department of History, Loyola University Chicago)
Roman Ceramics in Roman Cooking Texts

17:25 – 17:45
Jerolyn Morrison (School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester), Thomas Brogan (INSTAP Study Center for East Crete), Dimitra Mylona & Chrysa Sofianou (Kappa Delta Ephoria)
Cooking Up New Perspectives for Late Minoan Domestic Activities: An Experimental Approach to Understanding the Possibilities and the Probabilities of Ancient Cook-Pot Use

17:45 – 18:10 Discussion

 

18:10 – 20:30 Poster session and reception

 

 


Friday, 17th December 2010

 

9:00 – 9:20 Registration

Session : 5 Cuisine and Society

9:20 – 9:40
John Wilkins (Department of Classics and Ancient History, University of Exeter)
Cooking, Class and Health: Galen on Food Processing

9:40 – 10:00
Bartek Lis (Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw)
From Cooking Pots to Cuisine.  Limitations and Perspectives of a Ceramic-based Approach

10:00 – 10:20
Julie Hruby (Department of Art, Berea College)
Finding Haute Cuisine: Identifying Shifts in Food Style from Cooking and Serving Vessels

10:20 – 10:40
Liz Langridge-Noti (Deree College, Athens)
Unchanging Tastes: First Steps Towards the Correlation of the Evidence for Food Preparation and Consumption in Ancient Laconia

10:40 – 11:05 Discussion

 

11:05 – 11:35 Coffee

 

Session: 6 Kitchen Pottery: Innovation or Tradition?

11:35 – 11:55
Susan Rotroff (Department of Classics, Washington University in Saint Louis)
A Thousand Years of Athenian Cooking Pots

11:55 – 12:15
Sara Strack (School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester)
The Regular (post-)Mycenaeans. A View Beyond the Elites Through the Window of Utilitarian Ceramics

12:15 – 12:35
Beatrice McLoughlin (Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, University of Sydney)
Coarseware Production at Zagora: Pottery Specialization on Islands of Abundance

12:35 – 12:55
Eleni Manakidou (Department of History and Archaeology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)
Local and Imported Kitchen Ware from the Settlement at Karabournaki/Thessaloniki in the Archaic Period

12:55 – 13:20 Discussion

 

13:20 – 14:20 Sandwich lunch

 

Session: 7 Ceramics, Cuisine, Contact: Kitchen Pottery in an Interconnected Mediterranean World I

14:20 – 14:40
Alexander Fantalkin (Department of Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Cultures, Tel Aviv University)
Coarse Ware as Indicator for Egyptian Presence in Palestine: A Diachronic Perspective

14:40 – 15:00
Mareike Heinritz (Freie Universität, Berlin)
"Northward ho! Greek and Non-Greek Elements in the Cuisine of Colonial Settlements in the Northern Black Sea Steppe"

15:00– 15:20
Günther Schörner (Institute of Classical Archaeology, University of Erlangen)
Cooking in Roman Tuscany: Innovations and Traditions

15:20 – 15:45 Discussion

 

15:45 – 16:15 Coffee

 

Session 8:  Ceramics, Cuisine, Contact: Kitchen Pottery in an Interconnected Mediterranean World II

16:15 – 16:35
Alessandro Quercia (School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester)
Acculturation, Adaptation and Resistance in the Cuisine of Magna Graecia: Cooking Ware in Interior and Coastal Lucania

16:35 – 16:55
Sabine Ladstätter (Austrian Archaeological Institute at Athens)
Kitchen Pottery in Ptolemaic Syene

16:55 – 17:15
Sabine Fourrier (Maison de l’Orient et de la Méditerranée-Jean Pouilloux, Université Lyon)
Kitchen Pottery from Iron Age Cyprus

17:15 – 17:35
Kristina Winther-Jacobsen (SAXO-Institute, Classical Archaeology, University of Copenhagen)
Cypriot Cooking Wares between the Hellenistic and Roman World: Artifact Variability, Assemblage Differentiation, Technological Choice and Change of Practice

17:35 – 18:00 Discussion/Closing remarks

 


Poster presentations

 

Morgane Andrieu (Université de La Sorbonne, Paris)
“Graffiti”: Roman Inscriptions on Kitchen Pottery

William Balco, Michael J. Kolb & Valentina Musella (Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)
Opening the Cupboard of the Past: Archaeometric Analysis of Kitchen Pottery from Salemi, Sicily

Richard Carlton (University of Newcastle upon Tyne)
The Influence of Culinary Tradition on Pottery Making Traditions in the Western Balkans

Miguel A. Cau, Josep M. Macias, P. Berni(Department of Prehistory, Ancient History and Archaeology, Universitat de Barcelona)
LRCW.net: A web site with a virtual laboratory for the study of Coarse and Cooking Wares in the Late Antique Mediterranean

Channa Cohen Stuart (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
Unraveling the Mysteries of Negbite ware

Catalin Cristescu ("Babeş-Bolyai" University, Cluj-Napoca)
Cooking for the King. The Kitchen Pottery from Sarmizegetusa Regia

Anne-Marie Curé (Université de Montpellier 3, UMR5140 “Archéologie des Sociétés Méditerranéennes”)
Mediterranean-type Cooking Ware in Indigenous Contexts During the Iron Age in Southern Gaul

Bettina Fischer-Genz (German Archaeological Institute, Orient-Abteilung, Berlin)
Culinary Practices and Storage Strategies of Rural Settlements in the Territory of Heliopolis/Baalbek, Lebanon

Jane Francis (Concordia University, Montreal)
Cooking pottery from the Sphakia Survey (West Crete): Shapes, Fabrics, and Function

Andrew Graham (Department of Historical Studies, University of Toronto Mississauga)
Mesha Ware: Reflections on Technology Pathways in Iron Age Moab

Jean-Sebastien Gros (Université de Strasbourg)
The "batterie de cuisine" of the LG period from Oropos and Xombourgo (Greece)

Hanna Hamel (German Archaeological Institute, Orient-Abteilung, Berlin)
The remains of Feasting? A Deposit of Pottery within the Context of a Banquet Hall at Baalbek/Heliopolis (Lebanon)

Anno Hein, Noémi Müller & Vassilis Kilikoglou (Institute of Materials Science, N.C.S.R. “Demokritos”, Athens)
Heating Efficiency of Archaeological Cooking Vessels: Computer Models and Simulation of Heat Transfer

Lars Heinze (Institut für Archäologische Wissenschaften der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt/Main)
Cooking Devices and Cultural Identity – Some Suggestions based on the Cooking ware from 4th / 3rd Century Priene (Turkey)

Gudrun Klebinder-Gauß (Department of Classical Archaeology, University of Salzburg ) & Sara Strack (School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester)
The Death of the Attic Cooking Pot: Hostile Takeover of Ceramic Production by Aeginetans

Mandy Mamedow (Historisches Institut - Ägyptologie, Universität Potsdam)
Firecatcher: Ptolemaic and Roman Cooking Vessels from Bubastis

António José Marques da Silva (Centro de Estudos Arqueológicos das Universidades de Coimbra e do Porto)
Dynamics of Kitchen Pottery and Cultural Identity in a Colonial Context. The Case Study of the Indigenous Settlement of the Roman Limes of the NO of the Iberian Peninsula: Castro do Vieito

Laure Meulemans (Department of History of Art and Archaeology, CEMA, Université Catholique de Louvain)
Vivaria in Doliis: Cultural and Social Mark of Romanized Society?

Noémi Müller (STARC, The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia), Anno Hein (Institute of Materials Science, N.C.S.R. “Demokritos”, Athens), Peter Day (Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield) & Vassilis Kilikoglou (Institute of Materials Science, N.C.S.R. “Demokritos”, Athens)
Ceramic Recipes, Thermal Properties and Cooking Methods - Putting Thermal Conductivity on the Menu

Raffaella Pappalardo (Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples)
The Kitchen Ware from Tell Barri (Syria)

Harriet Robinson (Otisfield)    
Ceramic Fabrics: Clues to Minoan Cooking Pottery Manufacture

Wolf Rudolph (Berlin)
Halieis and Mycenae: Pots for Daily Sustenance

Jenny Schlehofer (Humboldt-University, Berlin)
Preparation of Meals within the Necropolis at Halieis

Anne Sieverling (TU Darmstadt)
Food Patterns and Their Development in Akarnania

Michela Spataro (Department of Conservation and Scientific Research, The British Museum) & Alexandra Villing (Department of Greece and Rome, The British Museum)
Mortaria: Production and Trade in the Archaic and Classical Mediterranean

Giacomo Tabita (University of Turin)
Trading Network of Roman Cooking Ware on the Euphrates River (1st-3rd century AD). 
Preliminary Results on Typology, Chronology and Distribution of the So-Called “Brittle Ware” Production from the Roman Fortress of Kifrin (Iraq)