Tracing Networks

Craft Traditions in the Ancient Mediterranean and Beyond

Global Ubiquitous Computing

José Fiadeiro, Emilio Tuosto, Laura Bocchi

This research programme has a very ambitious goal with a potential far-reaching impact: to project techniques arising from socioeconomic, cultural and "technological" craft networks of ancient civilisations to modern distributed computation paradigms. A key factor for the success and uptake of software development techniques by industry has been their close relationship with socioeconomic metaphors. E.g., object-oriented programming is inspired by social networks: software components cooperate through a-priori shared knowledge as much like as village economies require mutual knowledge among people. Global Ubiquitous Computing promotes new computational models based on code/data mobility over dynamic networks where "context-awareness" is crucial: software components move to take advantage of remote resources, as companies/people do in the global economy. This enables new modalities of interaction, that is, an opportunity for the chaîne opératoire of socioeconomic models to be reflected in new computing paradigms so as to improve efficiency. This aspect of the sub-project aims to explore such newly opened avenues by reflecting how networks of crafts-people and craft traditions operate in human societies, opening the way for competitive, opportunistic, self-organising and selfish computations.

Global Ubiquitous Computing